Northumberland County Council - Cemeteries, crematoriums and memorials (2022)

Cemeteries and crematorium - Coronavirus updates

The latest information regarding burials and cremations and how these are operating during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

To view the 2022/2023fees, click here

To learn more about arranging a funeral click here.


Cemeteries

Cemeteries remain open to the public.

Cremations:

With the restrictions now being lifted, here at Blyth Crematorium, there are no legal limits on the number of people who can attend cremation Services, but we still are advising that family and friends who attend the service wear a face mask in the chapels or even if standing outside.

We still have hand sanitizer in place for anyone who wishes to use it at the entrance to both chapels and in the waiting room.

Webcasting:

Webcasting is still in place for families to use and there now is a fee for this service.

Burials:

Restrictions for burials have also been lifted but again face masks are asked to be used by families.

Blyth Crematorium Office:

Blyth Crematorium office will be opening as from the 11October 2021, with new office opening times as set out below:

Day of the weekMorning timesAfternoon times
MondayClosed2pm to 4pm
Tuesday10am to 12noon2pm to 4pm
Wednesday10am to 12noon2pm to 4pm
Thursday10am to 12noon2pm to 4pm
FridayClosedClosed

The link below details current government guidance regarding funerals:

Cemeteries

Please note: Due to the current guidelines regarding COVID-19, the Bereavement Services office located in Blyth Cemetery is closed to members of the public.

All enquiries should be forwarded to blyth.crematorium@northumberland.gov.uk

Alnwick [Alnwick/Denwick Joint Board]
Managed by Alnwick Town Council
Council Offices
Greenwell Lane
Alnwick
Northumberland
NE66 1HB

Contact: Town Clerk Peter Hately 01665602574 or email clerk@alnwick-tc.gov.uk

Amble West
Managed by Amble Town Council
Fourways 2
6 Dilston Terrace
Amble
Northumberland
NE65 0DT
Contact: Town Clerk Ms Vicki Smith 01665 714695 or email townclerk@amble.gov.uk

Beadnell
Managed by Beadnell Parish Council
Morven
11 Springhill Lane
Tweedmouth
TD15 2QN
Contact: Parish Clerk Mrs Isobel Hunter 01289 306365 or 07836345489 or email beadnellparishcouncil7@gmail.com

Berwick - North Road
Managed by NCC
Contact area admin team: 01670 620490
Administration office: Tweedmouth Depot

Chevington
Managed by NCC
Contact area admin team: 01670 624418 or 624419
Administration office: Coopies Lane Depot

Embleton
Spitalford Cemetery
Managed byEmbleton Joint Burial Committee [Embleton/Craster/Newton-by-the-Sea]
Contact: Mr Geoff Newcombe
c/o 18 Horsley Place
Christon Bank
Alnwick NE66 43FB
01665 571239
Contact by email: ejbcepc@outlook.com

Felton: Joint Burial Board
46 Main Street
Felton
NE65 9PZ
Contact: Mrs Hazel Hood 01670 787190

Longframlington: Joint Burial Board
Managed by Longframlington Parish Council
5 Wardle Terrace
Longframlington
NE65 8AB
Contact: Parish Clerk Mr Garth Rhodes 01665 570347 or email longframlingtonpc@gmail.com

Morpeth, Fairmoor
Managed by NCC
Contact area admin team: 01670 624418 or 624419
Administrations office: Coopies Lane Depot NE61 3JL

North Sunderland(South Lane Cemetery - closed to new plots)
Managed by North Sunderland and Seahouses Parish Council
Contact: Acting Parish Clerk Mrs S Hillan, 16 Kippylaw, Seahouses, NE68 7YH01665 720458
Email: sylviahillan@aol.com

Pegswood
Managed by NCC
Contact area admin team: 01670 624418 or 624419
Administration office: Coopies Lane Depot, NE61 6SH

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Rothbury
Managed by Rothbury Parish Council
14 Addycombe Close
Rothbury
NE65 7QF
Contact: Parish Clerk Claire Miller 01669 621565 or email rothburyparishcouncil@hotmail.com

Shilbottle
Managed by Shilbottle Parish Council
30 Grange Road
Shilbottle
Alnwick
NE66 1XN
Contact: Parish Clerk Daniel Metcalf 01665 575369 or 07714262502 or email Daniel.metcalf1@hotmail.co.uk

Tweedmouth
Managed by NCC
Contact area admin team: 01670 620490
Administration office: Tweedmouth Depot

Ashington, Holy Sepulchre Church, NE63 8HZ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Ashington, St Aidan's Church, NE63 8AD
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Ashington, St John's Church, NE63 0TQ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Bedlington, NE22 6DZ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Bothal, St Andrew's Church, NE61 6XF
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Blyth Cowpen, NE24 5SZ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Blyth Links, NE24 3PJ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Choppington, St Pauls the Apostle, NE62 5SX
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Cramlington Mayfield, NE23 2AJ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Cramlington, St Nicholas Church, NE23 6EX
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Cresswell, St Bartholomew's Church, NE61 5JT
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Coopies Lane Depot, NE61 6SH

Horton, St Mary the Virgin, NE24 4HG
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Lynemouth, NE61 5XB
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Newbiggin,Woodhorn Church of St Mary, NE64 6HZ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

North Seaton, NE63 0TQ
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Seaton Delaval Church of our Lady, NE26 4QR
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Seghill, Holy Trinity, NE23 7EA
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Sleekburn, St Peters, NE62 5XE
Managed by NCC
Contact Stephen Kelly: 01670 620405
Administration office: Cowpen Cemetery

Allendale
Managed by Allendale Parish Council
Hollin Close
Allendale
NE47 9AW
Contact: Parish Clerk Ms Helen Newsome Tel: 01434 683359 or Mob: 07773640299 or email: allendaleparishcouncil@outlook.com

Bellingham
Managed by Bellingham Parish Council
Darmel House
Bellingham
NE48 2DQ
Contact:Parish Clerk Mr Benjamin Dickson-Green Email:bellinghamparishclerk@outlook.com

Corbridge
Contact: Tyne Mills Admin Team
Mob:07966 330762

Falstone
Jointly managed by: Falstone and Kielder Parish Councils
2 Hawkhope Road
Falstone
Hexham
NE48 1BD
Contact: Parish Clerk Mrs Josephine Sanderson Tel: 01434 240319 or email: falstonepc@yahoo.co.uk

Haltwhistle [Joint Burial Board]
Managed by Haltwhistle Town Council
Scotchcoulthard
Haltwhistle
NE49 9NH
Contact: Town Clerk Mrs Susan Saunders Tel: 01434 322601 or email: htcclerk@gmail.com

Haydon
Managed by Haydon Bridge Parish Council
Belmont Lodge
Belmont
Haydon Bridge
NE47 6HD
Contact: Parish Clerk Mrs Carole McGivern Mob: 07543912113 or email: haydonbridgeparish@gmail.com

Hexham, St. Andrew's
Managed by Hexham Town Council
Council Office
St. Andrew's Cemetery
West Road
Hexham
NE46 3RR
Contact: Town Clerk Mrs Jane Kevan Tel: 01434 609575 or email: clerk@hexhamtowncouncil.gov.uk

Ovingham
Managed by: Ovingham Joint Burial Committee
Wylam Institute
Church Road
Wylam
NE41 8AP
Contact: Parish Clerk Marie MooreTel: 01661 852498 or email: clerk@wylamparishcouncil.org

Ponteland
Managed by: Ponteland Town Council
Unit 1
Meadowfield Court
Meadowfield Industrial Estate
Ponteland
NE20 9SD
Contact: Town Clerk Mrs Kath Mavin Tel: 01661 825092 or email: k.mavin@ponteland-tc.gov.uk

Prudhoe, Edgewell
Managed by Prudhoe Town Council
The Spetchells Centre
58 Front Street
Prudhoe
NE42 5AA
Contact: Town Clerk Ms Sarah Eden Tel: 01661 835487 or email: info@prudhoetowncouncil.gov.uk

Managed by NCC on behalf of Ponteland Town Council
Contact: NCC Administration Office, Coopies Lane Depot
(01670) 621250 or email CastleMorpethCemeteries@northumberland.gov.uk

For Muslim Burial Requests
Contact: NCC Administration Office, Coopies Lane Depot
(01670) 621250 or email CastleMorpethCemeteries@northumberland.gov.uk

  • Please view our cemetery regulations here.

Crematorium

Please note: Due to the current guidelines regarding COVID-19, the bereavement services office is closed to the public.

All enquiries should be forwarded to blyth.crematorium@northumberland.gov.uk

For the latest information please click here.

Cowpen Road
Blyth
NE24 5SZ

  • Tel: 01670 620405
  • Email: blyth.crematorium@northumberland.gov.uk
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  • toilets
  • disabled access
  • wheelchair facilities
  • book of remembrance room
  • garden of remembrance
  • burial chapel
  • crematorium chapel
  • office opening hours:
    • Monday to Thursday, 8am to noon and 1pm to 4.30pm
    • Friday, 8am to noon and 1pm to 4pm

We kindly ask tokens of remembrance are not placed in the gardens as they quickly deteriorate and soon become unsightly. For those who wish to bring flowers for special occasions or anniversaries, we respectfully suggest they are placed in the book of remembrance room.

Services may take place, Monday to Friday between 9.15am and 3.15pm, at 45-minute intervals. Services should be booked with the crematorium at least three working days in advance.

A full service will last approximately 20 minutes. If you would like a longer service or expect a large attendance number, it is possible to arrange additional time for a small charge.

You can choose to have the full service in the crematorium chapel or part of the service can be held in your own church, with a short committal ceremony held at the crematorium.

Alternatively, the full service can be held in your own church with the coffin brought for cremation with no further ceremony. The coffin will still be brought into the chapel and placed on the catafalque (raised platform) before entering the crematory.

When choosing a ceremony option, consult with the officiating minister to ensure the appointment is suitable to all parties.

It is not necessary to use a hearse to bring the coffin to the crematorium. When arranging personalised funerals, you may choose to use estate cars or hire a van. You could also use a biodegradable (cardboard) coffin, instead of the usual veneered coffin.

  • Cremation costs and fees are available here.

You will need to inform the hospital or medical practitioner, who last attended the deceased, of the cremation taking place. The crematorium or funeral director will require:

  • two cremation certificates, statutory form four and statutory form five
  • form four is signed by the doctor who last attended the deceased, setting out the cause of death and any other circumstances surrounding it
  • form five is completed by another doctor not involved in the treatment of the deceased
  • application for cremation form, form one, signed by the next of kin
  • notice of cremation form - if you are using a funeral director, they will have this or the crematorium office can provide it
  • registration certificates, part B and C
  • the coroner’s order for cremation or registration certificates part B and C for cremation or burial

All statutory forms must be delivered to the crematorium no later than 11am the day before the funeral service, as they need to be signed off by an independent medical referee.

The crematorium will need written instructions for the service and disposal of the cremated remains. The office will issue a cremated remains release certificate before they are able to release the remains. There are many options to choose from regarding the ashes.

Urn
After cremation, we can place the ashes in an urn that has been provided by you, or we can provide one for you.

  • Please see funeral costs and fees here.

Scattering of the ashes
The ashes can be scattered in the garden of remembrance at the crematorium. If you would like to scatter the ashes elsewhere, you must seek the permission of the landowner. To scatter the ashes at sea, you must obtain permission from the harbour master.

Burial of the remains
Ashes can be buried in a cremated remains plot at the crematorium, with a bronze memorial plaque. Each plot can hold up to four cremated remains. Ashes can also be buried in a family grave plot.

There are various types of memorial and remembrance schemes available through Northumberland County Council.

  • For more information, please go to our memorials page.

The book has been individually designed and produced by artist-craftsmen and is kept at the crematorium in the book of remembrance room. This is a reflective, quiet space for people to use whenever they want to. It is open 365 days a year.

The book will be opened on the anniversary of the date of death. A page is allotted to each day of the year.
Relatives and friends may have a memorial entry recorded in the book on the date of death.

Regimental, civic and other suitable decorations can be added at an extra cost to entries of no less than five lines. The inscriptions are in black, red and gold and can be seen at the crematorium.

Heraldry and floral motifs are rendered in full colour in the book.

Book of remembrance room opening times:

  • April to September - opens at 8am and closes at 8pm
  • October to March -opens at 8am and closes at 6:30pm

Please note: the door in the book of remembrance roomwill automatically be locked at closing time each day, however any person still in the room will still be able to leave.

The garden of remembrance has been constructed as a memorial to all who have been cremated at Blyth crematorium. The many trees, shrubs and flowers are for the benefit of those who find the garden sacred.

Relatives of the deceased are asked to refrain from placing tokens of remembrance of any kind in the gardens, as they quickly deteriorate.

If you would like to bring flowers for special occasions or anniversaries, we respectfully suggest that these are placed in the book of remembrance room.

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  • For a copy of the Wesley Media Fees Booklet 2019-19 please click here

Memorials

A memorial is a special way to commemorate your loved ones and there are various types of remembrance scheme available through Northumberland County Council.

If you would like to enquire about a memorial, please check with the cemetery directly.

  • For a list of memorial costs and fees click here.

Memorial headstones
Any memorial on a grave must be installed by a monumental mason who is registered with the Northumberland County Council registration scheme. The monumental mason will ensure all necessary paperwork is submitted to the relevant bereavement services office.

You do not have to use the memorial mason recommended by your funeral director and you may wish to compare quotes from different companies. A list of approved masons is available from the county council by calling 0345 600 6400.

Fixed vases
Subject to approval, vases are permitted in all council cemeteries. These must be installed by a monumental mason who is registered with the Northumberland County Council registration scheme.The monumental mason will ensure all necessary paperwork is submitted to the relevant bereavement services office.

If you wish to place a memorial of any description on a grave, it has to be approved by the council and the appropriate fee paid. Otherwise, we have the right to remove it without informing you.

Designated lawn section of the cemetery:

  • height restriction of three feet six inches (1050mm)
  • width restriction of three feet (900mm)

Cremated remains lawn section:

  • height restriction of two feet six inches (750mm)
  • width restriction of two feet (600mm)

No kerbs or railing surrounds are allowed in the lawn sections as these may cause damage to maintenance equipment or potential injury to operatives or other visitors to the cemetery. Also, maintenance to these sections cannot be completed to a high standard.

In some cemeteries, we have installed a concrete plinth to accommodate memorials. However, if there is no plinth you will still be allowed to have the memorial installed as soon as possible.

It is the memorial owner’s responsibility to maintain memorials in a safe condition throughout the period of the exclusive right of burial.

Bereavement service staff will be carrying out routine inspections of all memorials.

Over the past five years, there have been accidents involving members of the public in cemeteries across the country and several have been fatal. This is why councils inspect memorials at least once every five years.

The exclusive right of burial (deed holder) will receive a letter and it will be their responsibility to arrange suitable repairs. Any repairs should only be carried out by an approved Northumberland County Council monumental mason.

It is the responsibility of the deed holder to the grave.

There have been notices posted within the cemetery grounds about the safety inspection process. We encourage all memorial owners or visitors to the graves to update current contact details so we can keep them informed of future memorial inspections. You can contact neighbourhood services on 0345 6006400 to update your details.

Our staff will carry out the safety testing survey. First, a visual inspection will identify the type of memorial and its condition. Second, using slight hand pressure, the stability of the memorial is measured to ensure it isn’t a danger to the public. We employ a risk assessment scale to record this data:

Risk High, Medium and Low

Risk High: Will be marked with either tape or small warning notice. Memorial Fail Letter, List of approved memorial masons, will be posted out to last known address of the deed owner (Attempt to contact Deed Owners / Family to fund repair, Need to be made safe within 4 weeks).

Risk Medium: Will be marked with either tape or small warning notice. Memorial Fail Letter, List of approved memorial masons, will be posted out to last known address of the deed owner (Attempt to contact Deed Owners / Family to fund repair, reinspect yearly to ensure signs and tape still in place, photograph and log checks.)

Risk Low: Passed, Reinspect within 5 years Each memorial within every cemetery and churchyard under the service's jurisdiction shall be inspected in accordance with the above classifications. The inspection scheme shall be reviewed on an annual basis.

If a memorial fails the inspection we will write to the deed owner at the last known address we have informing them of the safety inspection results and offering advice for them.

(Video) Meeting of Full Council on Wednesday 7 July from 3pm

We understand this news may be upsetting and we apologise for any distress caused. If your memorial requires work to make it safe, you can employ a Northumberland County Council-registered monumental mason to reinstate the memorial’s foundation or carry out repair work.

Do not attempt to repair or remove the memorial yourself. Only approved Northumberland County Council monumental masons should carry out this kind of work.The monumental mason will ensure all necessary paperwork is submitted to the relevant bereavement services office.

We are continuing to implement a safety inspection programme of memorials within the eight council-managed cemeteries and numerous churchyards countywide. We will do all we can to ease the upset that may be caused by this safety action.

Ensure your contact details are up-to-date by calling neighbourhood services on 0345 600 6400. Please also use this number if you are concerned about the safety of your memorial. For peace of mind, we recommend buying insurance cover. Please consult a registered monumental mason for company recommendations.

Be aware cemeteries are potentially dangerous places. Visitors should keep to footpaths, avoid touching memorials and ensure children are supervised at all times.

Within Northumberland, we have a substantial amount of war memorials in local authority cemeteries and churchyards. These graves are owned by the War Graves Commission.

If you require any information regarding the war memorials, please contact:

Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Head Office
2 Marlow Road
Maidenhead
Berkshire
SL6 7DX
Tel: +44 (0) 1628 634221
Fax: +44 (0) 1628 771208

Casualty enquiries

Tel: +44 (0) 1628 507200
United Kingdom Area
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Jenton Road
Sydenham
Leamington Spa
Warwickshire CV31 1XS
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 1926 330137
Fax: +44 (0) 1926 456595

Memorial plaques
Bronze memorial plaques can only be applied for and installed through Northumberland County Council. It can be fixed for 10 years to the edging along the paths in the garden of remembrance. The bronze memorial plaque is nine inches in length and three inches in depth and the inscription is cast.

Most families only wish for one name on the inscription, but it is possible to have two, as long as the inscription isn’t more than 75 letters, including spaces, on the five lines.

Memorial plaques in designated cemeteries
Where appropriate, brass memorial plaques are available to lease for a period of 10 years. They measure at six inches by four inches and can have an inscription of your choice and can only be applied for and installed through Northumberland County Council.

Memorial benches
Once approved, memorial benches with a bronze plaque can be purchased and placed in a suitable location in Northumberland if space is available. Provision of a memorial bench must be done solely through the council as this is a standardisedagreed build. All memorial benches and plaques come with a 10-year lease, which is renewable.

The book is kept at the crematorium in the book of remembrance room, open 365 days a year.

  • Please see here for more information.

Application forms to have a loved one’s name included in this book are available from the crematorium office or in the book of remembrance room.

Book of remembrance room opening times:

  • April to September - opens at 8am and closes at 8pm
  • October to March -opens at 8am and closes at 6:30pm

Please note: the door in the book of remembrance roomwill automatically be locked at closing time each day, however any person still in the room will still be able to leave.

Memorial cards and miniature books of remembrance are intended as a personal remembrance. Once applied for, they will be sent to the applicant direct from the manufacturers.

They provide family records and could be sent to distant relatives and friends. The books/cards are of very high quality and will have the same craftsmanship and inscription as seen in the large books at Blyth crematorium.

Examples can be seen at Blyth crematorium. Application forms are available from the crematorium office or in the book of remembrance room.

The garden of remembrance has been constructed as a memorial to all who have been cremated at Blyth crematorium.

  • Please see here for more information.

If required, your loved one's cremated remains can be scattered in this area.

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FAQs

Can you have an open coffin at a crematorium? ›

The coffin or container with the body inside shall not be opened or otherwise disturbed, other than in exceptional circumstances, and then only with the express permission and in the presence of the Applicant for Cremation (usually the executor or next of kin).

Are bodies cremated straight after service? ›

Are Bodies Cremated Straight After Service? Yes. In most cases the body is cremated as soon as the service has finished. The only exception to this would be if the funeral service is late in the day or if there is some problem with the crematoriums facilities.

How long before the funeral is the grave dug? ›

Are graves filled in straight after a funeral or are they left to the next day? Graves are prepared for burial at least one full day before the funeral and are covered overnight.

Do you see the body at a cremation? ›

Yes. This is called a "witness cremation" or simply a "cremation viewing." Family members may watch as the body is brought into the cremation retort and the process of cremation is begun.

Are you cremated with clothes on? ›

In most cases, people are cremated in either a sheet or the clothing they are wearing upon arrival to the crematory. However, most Direct Cremation providers give you and your family the option to fully dress your loved one prior to Direct Cremation.

What is removed from a body before cremation? ›

How is a body cremated? Before the cremation can take place, any metal parts attached to the coffin, like handles, are removed. The cremator is heated to a temperature between 800-1000 degrees. The coffin is then inserted into a cremation chamber – with the deceased placed feet-first.

Can you wake up during cremation? ›

Direct cremations typically don't allow for a viewing, visitation, or wake beforehand. Most families will schedule a memorial service at a later date for friends and family to pay their respects.

Which part of body does not burn in fire? ›

Quite often the peripheral bones of the hands and feet will not be burned to such a high intensity as those at the centre of the body, where most fat is located.

Why do they cover the legs in a casket? ›

If someone donated their skin tissue after death, this is usually taken from the lower half of the body. This means the body will be preserved in a special plastic undergarment to protect it from leaking into the casket. To cover this, the lower half will not be exposed at the funeral viewing.

What does it mean when a grave sinks in? ›

What is grave subsidence? Grave subsidence refers to the appearance of graves 'sinking'. This is an entirely natural process caused by loosened soil settling into place and the natural process of the coffin collapsing overtime.

Why does a grave have to be 6 feet deep? ›

To Prevent the Spread of Disease

People have not always understood how diseases spread. During disease outbreaks, they may have feared that bodies could transmit disease. Still, this may be one of the reasons why people thought bodies should be buried 6 feet deep.

Why is the man buried on the left? ›

One theory is that long ago husbands decided their wives belonged on their left side, the side closest to their heart. Other theories hold this placement is a reflection of a couple's wedding day. When walking down the aisle, the man is traditionally standing to the right of his bride.

How long does it take to cremate a human body? ›

The process takes anywhere between three to four hours depending on the power of the retort and the mass of the body inserted. After this step is completed, the cremated bones will come out of the retort and then be processed.

How many bodies are cremated at once? ›

Only one body can be cremated at once, and all cremated remains must be cleared from the cremation chamber before another cremation can begin. These standards do mean that you may have little input into any 'customization' of a cremation process.

Can you touch human ashes? ›

Is it safe to touch cremated remains? A.) While it is safe, remains can get stuck to your skin quite easily. It's best to wear gloves or use a spoon to scoop out remains before scattering.

What happens when the curtains close at a crematorium? ›

The impacting difference in closing the curtains or having them remain open is this; If the curtains close, the coffin is taken away from you, if the curtains remain open then it is you who must walk away from the coffin.

Do they bury you with shoes? ›

Answer: No, you don't have to, but some people do. People bring slippers, boots or shoes. When we dress a person in a casket, it can be whatever the family wants them to wear.

What happens to your Jewellery when you are cremated? ›

Please note that precious metal such as jewellery left on the deceased will melt during the cremation process, combine with ash and become granular and hence unrecognisable. Some is lost within the cremator and some will be within the ashes.

What happens to the brain during cremation? ›

Decomposition

If you're being cremated, your brain, like the rest of your body, will burn and become ash (usually the entire body is gone within 90 minutes).

Can you be cremated with your wedding ring on? ›

It may be a necklace, ring or pair of earrings that the deceased wore every single day; however with the high temperatures in the incinerator or retort, only fragments of their jewellery may be left over and unable to be restored.

How long do cremated ashes last? ›

In theory, cremated ashes can last forever. Some funeral homes have ashes from the 19th Century that are still in their urns, and archeologists have been known to discover ashes that are thousands of years old.

Can you be alive during cremation? ›

We've all thought about it at some point. What if I'm actually alive when I'm buried or cremated? For some people this is a serious fear, and hearing the random stories of it happening doesn't help. You'll be happy to know that being cremated alive is virtually impossible.

Can a funeral home not let you see the body? ›

Many funeral homes will not allow a public viewing unless embalming is performed. It is not a state or federal law that embalming be required. It is only a regulation by certain funeral homes. The regulation exists for many reasons including health safety, liability, and other undesired effects of decomposition.

How long after death does the body release fluids? ›

3-5 days after death — the body starts to bloat and blood-containing foam leaks from the mouth and nose. 8-10 days after death — the body turns from green to red as the blood decomposes and the organs in the abdomen accumulate gas.

Is it better to bury or burn a body? ›

Cremation reduces the body to cremated remains in a matter of hours, while traditional burial follows a slow and natural decomposition process. Direct cremations are more cost effective than direct burials, as they do not require embalming.

Does the skull burst during cremation? ›

The skull does not burst during cremation. The skull will become fragile and crumble.

Do human teeth burn in cremation? ›

What happens to teeth during cremation? Any teeth that do not burn during the process are ground down with bone fragments during the processing of the ashes. If the deceased had any gold teeth, the family can decide if they wish to have these removed prior to cremation.

Do morticians sew mouths shut? ›

A: The mouth can be closed by suture or by using a device that involves placing two small tacks (one anchored in the mandible and the other in the maxilla) in the jaw. The tacks have wires that are then twisted together to hold the mouth closed. This is almost always done because, when relaxed, the mouth stays open.

Is it painful when the soul leaves the body? ›

He said, “When the soul leaves the body, it can take a long time or it can happen very quickly. No matter how, it is painful. It is painful for the one who is dying, and it is painful for those who are left behind. The separation of the soul from the body, that is the ending of life.

Are brains removed during embalming? ›

To get into the cranium, the embalmers had to hammer a chisel through the bone of the nose. Then they inserted a long, iron hook into the skull and slowly pulled out the brain matter. Once they had removed most of the brain with the hook, they used a long spoon to scoop out any remaining bits.

What can you not do at a cemetery? ›

No running, yelling, or rolling around on the ground. This is not a place for childhood games. Don't let them play on any of the monuments. While it is good to get children used to paying respects at a cemetery, they often don't fully understand the meaning of everything in the cemetery.

How long does it take a coffin to collapse? ›

By 50 years in, your tissues will have liquefied and disappeared, leaving behind mummified skin and tendons. Eventually these too will disintegrate, and after 80 years in that coffin, your bones will crack as the soft collagen inside them deteriorates, leaving nothing but the brittle mineral frame behind.

Why do graves face east? ›

Most Christians tend to bury their dead facing east. This is because they believe in the second coming of Christ and scripture teaches that he will come from the east. In this manner, they place their dead in a position so they can meet Christ face-to-face during his second coming.

Why do coffins explode? ›

Why does it occur? Exploding casket syndrome happens when the natural decomposition processes are not given enough air and space. If a body decomposes in a completely airtight casket with no way of release, the gases will build up until the point of the casket bursting.

What is a grave without a body called? ›

Cenotaph - a grave where the body is not present; a memorial erected as over a grave, but at a place where the body has not been interred. A cenotaph may look exactly like any other grave in terms of marker and inscription.

Can a husband and wife be buried in the same casket? ›

Yes — Depending upon the cemetery's policy, you may be able to save a grave space by having the cremains buried on top of the casketed remains of your spouse, or utilize the space provided next to him/her. Many cemeteries allow for multiple cremated remains to be interred in a single grave space.

What does a penny mean on a grave? ›

A penny means you visited. A nickel means you and the deceased veteran trained at boot camp together. A dime means you and the deceased veteran served together in some capacity. A quarter is very significant because it means that you were there when that veteran died.

Why are headstones placed at the feet? ›

This approach has roots in Christian tradition, where a marker would be set with the head of the deceased to the west while their feet pointed east. The placement of bodies this way meant that those departed will face the rising sun and Jesus upon his resurrection.

What does IHS mean on a gravestone? ›

IHS Symbol

Iesus Hominem Salvator (Jesus Saviour of Mankind). The letters are known as a christogram, a combination of letters that forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ.

Can you have an open casket funeral UK? ›

Early in the 20th century it was common to view the body after death, but today in the United Kingdom it is usual to have a closed casket for the funeral, and people may not see the body beforehand.

Are open casket funerals common? ›

It is common to have a brief open-casket viewing before the funeral service. The viewing is often held at the same location that the funeral service will be held, but may also take place at a mortuary or funeral home.

Why do funerals have open caskets? ›

In an open casket funeral, the casket remains ajar allowing those in mourning to view the body. Some people feel that an open casket funeral allows them to stay more physically connected to their loved one. Others have said that an open casket funeral gives them more closure.

What happens at an open casket funeral? ›

During an open casket funeral service, the casket lid will be open for attendees to view the body of your loved one. Embalming is typically done, along with hair, makeup, and clothing so that the decedent resembles what they looked while alive.

Why do they cover the legs in a casket? ›

If someone donated their skin tissue after death, this is usually taken from the lower half of the body. This means the body will be preserved in a special plastic undergarment to protect it from leaking into the casket. To cover this, the lower half will not be exposed at the funeral viewing.

Who sits in the front row at a funeral? ›

The family and pallbearers occupy the front rows, with friends filling vacant places on either side. The service begins when everyone is seated. At memorial services and at a funeral where the coffin or urn is already present, there is no processional.

How long can a body stay in the morgue UK? ›

A body can be refrigerated for three to four weeks, but if you need to delay the funeral then it can remain there a little longer. If the body is embalmed, then there's no need for refrigeration.

Is the body in the coffin at a funeral? ›

A casket is a specially-designed box made to contain a deceased person's body. It's typically used during a funeral service for viewing the body. Then, if the family has not chosen a cremation burial, the casket containing the body is lowered into the ground during the burial ceremony.

How long can a body be kept at a funeral home? ›

When properly stored and cooled, a body can be kept for up to six weeks at the funeral home, so you'll have plenty of flexibility when planning your memorial service. Cremation has become an increasingly popular option for people around the country. In fact, more bodies are now cremated than buried.

Do undertakers remove organs? ›

Unless the person who died was an organ donor, they will be embalmed with their organs inside their body. When someone has a post-mortem to identify their cause of death, the organs are removed and weighed. They are replaced inside the body cavity, before it leaves the mortuary.

Why would the funeral director advised not to see a body? ›

Once there relatives can usually see the body as often as they wish. Occasionally a funeral director or family liaison officer will advise a family against viewing the body because of bodily injuries or because of decomposition.

How long does a casket last in a grave? ›

By 50 years in, your tissues will have liquefied and disappeared, leaving behind mummified skin and tendons. Eventually these too will disintegrate, and after 80 years in that coffin, your bones will crack as the soft collagen inside them deteriorates, leaving nothing but the brittle mineral frame behind.

Why do bodies look different at funerals? ›

A body may be different in death to life because:

For example, skin has changed colour due to internal bleeding, or the body's facial appearance has changed due to a broken jaw, or cuts, etc. a mortician or funeral director has changed a body's appearance through clothing, or hair arrangement, or cosmetics.

Is it OK to touch the body at a funeral? ›

If you have an adult with you at the funeral home, it is ok to touch a dead body, and you will not get in trouble. You are naturally curious, and sometimes when you see and touch a dead body it helps you answer your questions. Remember to be gentle and have an adult help you.

How long after death can you view a body? ›

Fortunately, under most circumstances, dry ice can be used for viewing the body, having a visitation, or simply preserving the body for burial within 48 – 72 hours after death.

How is a body prepared for an open casket? ›

To embalm the body, they inject preservative chemicals into the circulatory system. Using a special machine, the blood is removed and replaced with the embalming fluid. Refrigeration can also preserve the body, but it's not always available. If it's necessary to transport unembalmed remains, they may be packed in ice.

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